Travel writing at September’s festivals

The following are a few of the events in September in which travel writing features:

Katharine Norbury, author of The Fish Ladder, which combines travelogue and memoir, will be speaking at the Borderlines Carlisle Book Festival (Sept 2-6; borderlinescarlisle.co.uk).

Four writers from Canada’s Atlantic coastline — Beth Powning, Michael Crummey, Serge Patrice Thibodeau and Sue Goyette — will discuss the history, culture and landscape of the region they describe in their novels, poetry and travelogues at the Blenheim Palace Festival of Literature, Film &  Music (Sept 24-27; blenheimpalaceliteraryfestival.com).

Speakers at the Appledore Book Festival, in Devon (Sept 25-Oct 4;  appledorebookfestival.co.uk), will include Philip Marsden, author of Rising Ground (shortlisted for the Stanford Dolman Travel Book Award), and Patrick Barkham, author of Coastlines: The Story of Our Shore.

At the Wigtown Book Festival (wigtownbookfestival.com; Sept 28-Oct 1), Dumfries and Galloway, Robert Twigger, author of Red Nile, talks about his current project on the Himalayas, White Mountain; Frank Gardner, BBC security correspondent, who has updated his bestselling memoir, Blood and Sand, talks of his fascination with the Arab world; Wendell Steavenson, a former winner of the Dolman prize for travel writing, introduces Circling the Square, her new book about the Egyptian revolution; Charlotte Higgins reports on her camper-van tour of Britain’s Roman remains for Under Another Sky; Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent, who rode a motorbike down the Ho Chi Minh trail, introduces A Short Ride in the Jungle; Donald S Murray, author of Herring Tales, recounts his journey from Lewis to the Baltic and Iceland to tell “How the Silver Darlings Shaped Human Taste and History”; and Malachy Tallack talks about his journey round the 60th parallel for Sixty Degrees North.

At the Henley Literary Festival (henleyliteraryfestival.co.uk; Sept 28-Oct 4), John Lister-Kaye talks about Gods of the Morning, his chronicling of the seasons at Aigas, the Highlands field centre; Harry Mount tells the story of ancient Greece through a 21st-century Odyssey; the explorer Ranulph Fiennes introduces his new book, Heat, a follow-up to the bestseller Cold; Tom Fort talks about the journey he made to write Channel Shore: From the White Cliffs to Land’s End; Caitlin Davies talks about swimming the Thames for Downstream; Matthew Clayton, author of Lundy, Rockall, Dogger, Fair Isle, and Matthew Engel, author of Engel’s England, compare notes on their travels.

Post a comment

Your email address will not be published.